by Melissa Smith| Arts and Entertainment Co-editor

Humidity. Sweat. Thirst. Pit stains. All of us had to endure the awful, tedious weather of the summer that is continuing into the school year. The drought this year has been pretty surprising, due to the extremely cold weather San Antonians experienced earlier in the year. Like they say: Texas is indeed the bi-polar state when it comes to weather. Kids have been handling the weather quite well, despite the circumstances it often finds them in.

Senior Micaela Campbell, a twirler in the Johnson band, had to spend the entire first half of August at band camp amidst the awful heat.

“They gave us a lot of breaks; like, to go inside and stuff, and to get water, and they’ll periodically give us breaks to come inside and give us breaks from the heat,” Campbell said.

Senior Bailey Ulrich finds the arid air a pain, and changes her everyday activities accordingly.

“It pretty much sucks- it’s too hot and makes me really tired all the time, [so I do a lot less].”

To others, it really doesn’t make a difference. Some, like Campbell, have no preference.

“It’s hot. I like the heat when I’m inside, in the pool, and, well, I don’t really have a lawn to take care of, so the water restrictions don’t really apply. So it’s whatever. ”

Ulrich, on the other hand, fails to find anything worthwhile about the 100- degree weather.

“It dries up all the water for the stray animals. There are really no positives,” she said in a joking tone.

The heat is so intense that some students don’t even want to sit in their car after its long stay outside during the school day.

“Whenever [I go to] my car, I roll down the windows and, like, chill outside until it cools down; for like twenty minutes,” junior Mathias Montaudon said.

The water restrictions are getting a tad intense. Citizens are instructed as to when they may water their gardens, and for how long. But the restrictions go beyond watering.

“Did you know you can’t open your fridge from three to seven? Its ridiculous,” senior Katie Burcham said, a Ulrich replied, “Yeah, I definitely don’t follow that: that’s, like, a lot of hours.”

To follow up on this story, the Johnson newspaper team decided to do a little experiment. After hearing some rumors about the band camp participants baking cookies in their car this August, the team wanted to see if this were indeed possible.

“I baked some cookies in my car. So did [senior] Brian Nethery; I got the idea from him. Mine were gluten-free cookies. They were delicious,” Campbell said.

The Pride’s cookies are- sorry to disappoint- not gluten-free.

The cookies were placed in a student’s truck in the passenger seat, right before school. When checked during fourth period, they were in the awkward halfway-cooked stage, but by the end of the day, they were completely cooked. A little gooey, but still satisfying.

“Wait, you baked cookies in your car? Like, you put raw cookie dough in your car, and they cooked? Wow. I’m really not surprised,” Montaudon said.

To other students, this phenomenon is nearly unbelievable.

“I think it’s kind of absurd. But as long as you got to eat some cookies in the end, it’s all good. But I can’t wait for winter,” junior Harmony Kreatziger said.

It is a fun little experiment to do- especially if you get to chow down on some cookies on the way home.

“I’m going to do it, I’m going to bake an egg or something, or cook an egg,” Montaudon said.

 

 

 

Print Friendly, PDF & Email

About The Author

Melissa Smith is a sad excuse for a senior and is the Co- Editor in Chief of The Pride Online. Smith had been on the publications staff for four years. Smith drives a blue Toyota Tacoma which has been known to be a breeding ground for rare bacteria that ferments in dirty clothes and old food. Smith is a free spirit who doesn't believe in marriage or bras.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.