Ask a Jag: staying connected

by Chloe Jordan | feature editor

Have you ever been caught up in drama? Placed in a situation where you felt socially awkward? Third wheeled? Felt good after an important conversation?

As a high schooler, you will experience a multitude of different social interactions – both the easy and awkward, positive and negative. Talking is not always easy. Some students offer advice for those who want to strengthen their relationships with others.

Staying Connected

“So, keeping the peace, generally I’ve noticed, because I’ve worked in fast food with customer service, I noticed that people will mimic the way you interact with them. So, if you show anger or aggression towards somebody, they’re going to reflect that hostility towards you. So, if you can minimize that, then that will reflect that off on that person. Even if it’s in the middle of an argument, and everyone is screaming, if you take that soft approach, everybody will easily mirror that back to you, and then you get a more calming argument. It de-escalates the situation.” -Devin Tyson, 12  

“Yeah, I guess just make sure you like try to keep in touch with them. You know, ask how they’re doing. If it’s a friend, find time to just hangout, because we really need to have face-to-face, after COVID and stuff. Just face-to-face interactions with people, sometimes it can make you go outside of your comfort zone a little bit, try something new, if you don’t like it, you hate it, you don’t have to do it. But if they’re really interested in something and you’re like, eh, kind of iffy about it, just step out of your comfort zone for a little bit.” -Aspen Chapa, 12

“It’s just a balance between school and extracurricular activities and friends. You have to make sure to spend time with friends, and get the stuff done that you need to get done.” -Walker Bryson, 10

“I don’t know, I think it’s really important that you find a friend group that aligns with your interests, but also that has the same values that you do. It’s important not to get caught up in peer pressure, so just finding friends that are going to help you achieve your long term goals is important. And, there are so many people that go to Johnson – there’s someone out there for everyone. There are a lot of groups to join, so just get involved. The biggest thing is that you get involved.” -Gabriella Mauldin, 12

“To be honest, I feel like, for me, it’s being honest to the people around you. Honesty. Because the minute you say a lie, the minute that’s not true, I feel like society just has rumors and when it comes to rumors, then everyone believes it, then everyone’s going to hate you, and then how all these really bad, negative events. I feel like, start being truthful and honest. I feel like it’s going to lead to an actual good moral society.” -Erin Kim, 12

Avoiding Conflict

“Make sure you get the whole story and the right story. Get different accounts from different people, and then you’re like ‘okay, I’m going to ask the people this actually happened to.’ Just because then you’re not believing things that are not true, and then you go and you spread it. Just stay out of it.” -Aspen Chapa, 12

“Do not start the conflict. Well, you can try to understand the other person and where they’re coming from. And then, apologize if it’s your fault.” -Sarah Pollock, 11

“Don’t get worked up about small things. It’s better to use forgiveness than to harbor ill will towards someone. Just choose forgiveness and always choose to be kind if you can.”
-Gabriella Mauldin, 12

“I guess, the big thing is not saying anything that comes to your head. Watching what you say is really a big thing. Because I feel like, if you say anything you want, the person might, all other people might come to bad events or quarrels.” -Erin Kim, 12

Supporting Others

“Honestly, if they’re giving 100%, give 100% back, and just always let them be aware that you’re there for them, and that, you know, you’re not going anywhere.” -Aspen Chapa, 12

“I guess, a big thing is being behind them when they fall, or just ready to pick them up. The most important thing is emotional support. For me, I’m not really a fixing person, so. I feel like I’m not actually a good person to fix the problem. So, I feel like at least offering emotional support.” -Erin Kim, 12

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About The Author

Chloe Jordan is currently a junior at Johnson. She has enjoyed writing and journalism since seventh grade. Her other favorite hobbies include roller skating, collecting crystals, and painting. You’ll most likely find her in the Johnson Theatre workshop, backstage, or at a computer in A128. :)

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