Growing from ashes

 

Photo credit: U.S. Navy photo by Chief Journalist Alan J. Baribeau. / Foter / Public Domain Mark 1.0
Photo credit: U.S. Navy photo by Chief Journalist Alan J. Baribeau. / Foter / Public Domain Mark 1.0

For centuries, mankind has honored their dead by burying them six feet under ground in a casket. While this may be the traditional, sentimental method to dispose of loved ones, this is not an efficient method. Burial in a casket prevents a corpse from decomposing quickly and efficiently, the slow rotting process also favors sulfur-loving bacteria that can harm nearby water sources. If you think Cremation is the more eco-friendly way to go then you’re beyond wrong. Greenhouse gases such as carbon dioxide and nitrogen oxide are released in large volumes, along with carbon monoxide, sulphur dioxide, hydrogen chloride, hydrogen fluoride, particulate matter, heavy metals, dioxins and furans.

New methods are being developed such as Resomation and Promession. These methods are much more environmentally friendly. The remains resemble ashes but are nothing alike. No carbon footprint or harmful gases. The ashes from Promession 12 months after planting makes a great compost for growing a beautiful tree in the yard. Ashes from Cremation however are not useful for this. While you can put the cremation ashes in the soil, the plant will not grow off of the remains.

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