by Eduardo Calderon|News Editor

Joining the military is never an easy decision, a decision that requires a strong commitment as the army can call upon you at any moment.  Coach Miguel Avila understands the commitment, as he is deployed for the Army Reserves.

“Eventually I’ll head to Afghanistan,” Avila said, “I’m not sure what part yet.”

Deployment for the army is no vacation, as there is no predetermined time of being there, and there is no choice of return until the deployment is over.

“I’ve been told [I’ll be deployed] for at least a year from what I’ve been told from army officials,” Avila said.

Avila’s deployment comes in the middle of the year, having to separate himself for students he’s teached all year.

“I have to be indifferent, I can’t attach myself to seniors or my other students,” Avila said, “I’m saddened by it, and I’m having to deal with it.”

Students must learn how to deal with the loss of their teacher.

“I’m going to miss his funny lessons,” junior Alicia Vasquez said, “[The worst part] is we have to learn from a substitute.”

As students in Avila’s class are losing their teacher, they must prepare for the change.

“They’re not gonna like it, change is not liked, and they must adjust [to the substitute],” Avila said.

The adjustment can be difficult especially when a classroom is already adapted to its current situation.

“The structure of a classroom and the procedures are built in, so students know the expectations,” AP Stuart Guthrie said, “If there is a change in [the teacher], then there could be a change in the classroom.”

Although entering a new classroom can pose difficulty, substitutes come well-prepared for each class.

“We give them each a binder with the procedure, duties and expectation,” Guthrie said, “There’s a step further for long term sub [where we make] sure they understand the lesson plans.”

The end result in a classroom with a long term substitute usually depends on how the substitute can handle their new environment.

“It depends on how flexible they are, and if they can see the big picture of what needs to happen,” Guthrie said.

However, the long commitment that is given to the army does bring certain rewards.

“One of the best decisions I’ve ever made, it paid for my bachelor’s and master’s degree,” Avila said, “It’s an enhancement to life skills and benefits for college.”


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About The Author

Eduardo Calderon is a senior at Johnson High School. This is his third year as a member of the Pride, and his first year as the Pride's news editor. He enjoys the journalism field and the photography aspect as well. In his final year, he hopes to end on a good note with Johnson's student newspaper.

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